Travel Journal Entry #20: Devil Drinks In Praha

For everyone thinking about taking a short vacation to forget the workload waiting at home, Prague is a well deserved choice. The price level is quite low compared to Finland, the Public transportation works almost flawlessly and the city has plenty to offer for a long or short time visitor. 

Views from the Vltava river.

Once again a river (this time it’s Vltava) flows through the city and the views are way spectacular as a result. Large flocks of swans swim in the river and taddle into the beach to eat breadcrumbs from tourists. Large open deck boats pass through each others and the tourists keep waving to strangers at bay. 

Swan party yay!

For someone who appreciates quality drinks from beer to wine, there are plenty of options to choose from. Praha and it’s outskirts are home to many Chezch breweries. Buying drinks from the local market won’t hurt your wallet as one beer usually costs about 20 koruna (less than one euro)

Church of our Lady before Týn.

We spent four nights in Prague and our daytrips consisted of visiting the famous Bone church in Kutna Hora, spending one day walking in the Prague city center and last day we took a journey to the Prague Castle. As our wifi was the worst we ever experienced, we spent plenty of time adventuring.

Bone church in Sedlec. Aka Sedlec Ossuary.

The bone church of Sedlenc resides in the town of Kutna Hora, most easily reached by local train. Travel time to Kutna Hora is roughly 50 minutes so I advice you to bring your headphones for a good ol’ jolly time. As we were traveling in the low season we got a whole traveling cabin for ourselves. Easy living. From the train station you can either walk 1.3 kilometer to the church or pay roughly 50 cent to hop on a bus.

Family crest build from actual human bones.

The bone church is not a large attraction but rather a shocking one. The inside of the church is decorated with the bones of 4000 people. The church dates back to the middle ages and there is also open display for skulls of men who fought in the wars. Medieval weaponry made horrific damage to one’s skull and the survival rate from a strike was almost always zero. I recommend a visit there! 

Stairs to Praha Castle.

The Prague Castle is also worth mentioning for. You take this large steep rise of stairs to the top and you can see the whole skyline of Prague from the top. There are metal detection gates and a lot of police/army guarding the castle so it’s wise to leave large bags at the hotel. Less hassle and makes the entry and exit way easier.

Golden gates at Praha castle. Damn statues like to stab.

I will probably write a more extensive entry on Prague when I have arrived back to Finland. The thought of returning back to home still feels like a odd dejavu dream in back of my head. But all adventures must end. That doesn’t stop planning for a new one! Next stop will be city of Ostrava, can’t wait!

Enjoy your day!

– George

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Travel Journal Entry #19: The Shadows of Nürnberg

As the World War II slowed down after the Germany’s surrender in 1945, the infamous war crimes were uncovered from the shadows and the troubling news were read from all over the world. Justice had to be served. Court of justice was established in the German city of Nürnberg and sentences were given in what the world would later call the Nürnberg trials.

Nürnberg railway station under repair.

Before the World War II  the city of Nürnberg had been the epicenter of the Nazi party and the largest and most important Nazi rallies had been held there. As a conclusion it was a fitting end to sentence the Nazi war criminals in the same city where it all had started.

Entrance to the old town/city centre.

I was particularly curious how Nürnberg and its citizens had progressed from the heavy shadows of it’s past. Maybe it was the fact that I knowingly tried to compare Nürnberg to my earlier visits in Germany, the ambiance was different. A bit colder, a bit rougher, a bit darker. Nevertheless strangers felt friendly as always. 

As we only spent day and a half in Nürnberg, we had to make choices what to see. So we picked the city center and the Nurenberg castle near it for a day trip. Truthfully the city is not a tourist sensation, at least in the end of September. But that didn’t bother us at all as the local population kept the city busy. 

The past is water under the bridge?

The city centre was not a large one and you were able to walk from end to end in fifteen minutes. The river Pegnitz split the city center in two sides which enabled us to take a couple of bridge shots. The color of water has been fascinating to watch through Europe as it changes a lot. In Switzerland the water was light blue as in Nürnberg the water was deep green. 

Castle entrance out there somewhere!

The Nurenberg castle was located at the edge of the city center and the road leading to the castle was a steep one! Well, not horrible for a normal sized person but for me it was literally a small uphill battle. However every climb so far on my journey through Europe has been rewarded with great views of the city. This one was pretty neat if you don’t count how many cranes there are in the horizon!

View from the castle wall.

Anyhow the city of Nürnberg gave us a fresh experience of a smaller town in Germany. Perhaps there is more going on during the high season? Please do leave comments if you have first hand knowledge. Next journal will be from the city of Prague, Chezch Republic.

– George

Travel Journal Entry #17: The Highs’ of Salzburg 

There is nothing better in life than having low expectations about something then being blown out your mind with the results. For me Salzburg was one of those cities I had not heard before. Might just be a hole in my personal knowledge but I must confess that I’ll definitely return here sometime. Perfect place for 4-7 day trip.

Salzburgs’ own homeboy, Mozart.

What I suggest is that you purchase the Salzburg card from the main railway stations travel office, it will save you money and makes traveling way easier as the card includes free public transportation in the city. In high season the card costs 27€ and in low season 24€. You might think that is high cost but once you add up the places you might want to visit, half of the activities will be free.

They’re taking the hobbits to Unterberg.

Purchasing the card was no brainer for me and my friend as we wanted to experience the cable cars activities. Only the Unterberg cable car to top of the mountain and back cost 24€. It is only one of the roughly 65 places you can experience with the Salzburg card. Believe me, you won’t think about twice after seeing below photos.

1st view from up top. Yowza.

The city of Salzburg down below.

The Alps in the distance.

Amazing, huh? The air was crystal clear there and the views all around the mountain make you want to spend there time as much as possible. When you finally land back to the ground zero you will feel so small. So you might as well explore the old town of Salzburg. Compact and packed with boutiques, shops and restaurants, it’s fun to walk around and see where you end up. We ourselves ended up to eat tasty Salzburg burger from a local famous snack grill where even the president of Austria likes to eat out.

Even the old town of Salzburg has cliffs.

Now it’s time to say hello to Germany again and end up in München. Oktoberfest lured us here but there is plenty more things to explore than just lederhosen and big jugs (of delicious beer, that is). Have a great night! 
– George

Travel Journal Entry #13: Dubrovnik, Kings Landing

I’m quite sure the city of Dubronivk and specially the Old Town here will go down as one of the few grand stops on our entire journey through Europe. There has not been anything as remarkable in comparison that we have encountered on our adventure so far than this Croatian gem. Dubrovnivk, also known as Kings Landing for the Game Of Thrones fans, took us by suprise and made us fall in love with its’ charms.

Look at that view. Dubrovnik Old Town and the sea.

We travelled from Bari to Dubrovnik by a ferry cruise ship that was a keen memento to the 90’s. Old sea biscuit that had seen plenty of years on the open sea. I had ranted earlier about the social culture of Italy and the waiting game to enter the ferry ship was a bittersweet example about it. It took us 5 hours to get through the port terminal to the ferry ship and the departure was delayed by over two hours. The clock was roughly past midnight when we managed to crawl into our cabin for some good ol’ fashioned sleep. 

Arrival port at Dubrovnik.

The ferry arrived to Dubronivk at 8 o’clock in the morning so we had plenty of time to seek our wat to our hotel. Unfortunately the port was far away from the Dubrovnik old town so we hopped on a bus and started paying attention to our surroundings. Soon our eyes caught first glimpses of the old town and the massive walls surrounding the city. Ten minutes later we had found our hotel and left our luggage there.

The main street Stradun in Dubrovnik Old Town.

The old town is not on the larger side even though the city has plenty of side-alleys tp choose where you can find restaurants and various shops. You can easily get a bit lost when wandering around the city but you can always route back to the the main street that goes through the middle of the town. However the city itself and the oceanic views everywhere make you plainly forget that time even exists.

As our hotel room was not ready in the morning we decided to take the cable car up the mountain side and see the spectacular views from up there. Departure station was only 10 minute walk away. The ticket price was 140 Kuna (roughly 18,50€) but well worth it. From up there you could see the whole peninsula clearly and your lungs thank you for the fresh air. Truly a mesmerizing place.

Cable car wohooo!

I could tell you a lot of more about our visit to Dubrovnik but I  don’t want to spoil everything for you. All I can say is that visiting this place is highly recommended. Spending the last two days in Dubrovnik has given me personally a lot of energy to keep on going on this adventure and I can’t wait to see more. Next stop will be the Croatian city of Split! 

Have a great night!

– George

Travel Journal Entry #12: Every-Bari Dance Now

My advice to anyone to traveling in Italy: if you have already seen the big cities here and their main attractions, relocate asap to the smaller cities. The true italian lifestyle doesn’t really shine in a busy colossal city like Rome but you learn to appreciate it in a city that has a slower pulse rate.

Castles in the sand.

That is why I like Bari far better than the others. You find a lot of good restaurants and they have empty tables to swoop in without reservation. The streets are not too crowded to let pickpockets snatch easy targets. The city is easy to walk as you don’t have to bet your life on the line every time you cross the street (red light means “go but be very careful” to italians rather than “stop”).

Beach of Bari. Guess the season has ended.

What’s better for a northener like me, the coastal city has slighly lower temperatures due to the ocean breeze. Even 31′ degrees celsius (87.8 fahrenheit) feels a lot colder than in the main land. There are some sights to see (couple of churches, castle and other monuments) so you can spend a day or two exploring them. The beach almost fully covers the coastline and you can sit freely on a bench breathing fresh air.

Chuuuurch. Walked in and there was service in action.

I am rather conflicted do I like Italy or not, as during our stay here we ran into minor trouble, theft, traffic violations, unworkable public transportation, scammers and a lot of unlogical reasons how things work around here in Italy. The quality of restaurants, friendly people, street musicians and general ambience in smaller cities like Bari balance the scales.

Perhaps I have to ponder about my final verdict when I get back home. Tonight we’ll say goodbye to Italy and set sail to Croatia. First stop will be Dubronivk, also known as Kings Landing from hit-series Game of Thrones.

Enjoy your saturday, you know I will!

– George

Travel Journal Entry #11: The Tasty Tables of Naples


If you’re desperately hungry for a culinary orgasm, Naples will accordingly set you a meal you cannot forget. Apologies for the choice of words, kids. I can only assure you that I won’t order a sloppy pizza in Finland after this adventure. Because just like any breathtaking and luscious relationship that ended too swiftly, you will be comparing the next one against the latter. You shall be disappointed surely.

Mmmmm-mouth watering.

The Naples is notoriously famous for the pizza which is heated to perfection in special made napolian oven. The topping ingredients and the menú choices are carefully designed to bake a flavourful combination which makes you doubt the culinary standards in your home country.

As a city Naples has a rough center. The collection of thrashes and current behavior regarding waste is to let it lay in the gutter. It makes a traveller sad to see thrashed streets in a city like Naples. The flood of immigrants from Africa (my guess, I could be wrong) have a visible effect on the city as well. A lot of police patrols everywhere and the street merchants have stands on almost every corner. 

EU thrash. Not going to finals.

My first advice is to leave the city center next to the railway station and go a bit further to see mesmerizing views of the city. You can do this by traveling with metro to Castello Sant’Elmo. A enourmous castle on top of a hill with a breathaking view. If you don’t want to pay the entrance fee you can still gaze the city from the platform next to it.

Whew, what a view!

If your soul wants to wander to the ocean, another spectacular view can be obtained from the coast of Napoli. Free entrance to the Castell dell’Ovo is a big plus and you can easily spend hours there to scout the wonderful coast and the boats in action.

Panorama view from Castello dell’Ovo.

Since you’re in Naples you might want to visit the famous Pompeii city that was buried with it’s inhabitants in volcanic ashes in 79 AD due to the eruption of Vesuvius volcano. It’s a cruel reminder that we humans are sometimes powerless in the hands of nature. As the citizens of Pompeii were buried in the volcanic ashes, reserchers were able to fill the gaps in the ash with plaster. As a result we have now detailed molds of the very body positions of Pompeii citizens when they died in the disaster.

Requescat in Pace, young one.

Tomorrow morning we will say our goodbyes to Naples and do a quick one day tour in the northern coast of Italy, Bari. Then we will set sail and arrive to the Kings Landing to play a little Game Of Thrones! Croatia ahoy! 

Have a awesome day!

– George

Travel Journal Entry #10: All Roads Led To Rome

You are going to hate me for this travel entry the same way I will hate myself for writing this. This will be a bit of an angry rant my beloved readers. Blame it on the heat.

My two day experience of Rome is a bit of an homage to the negative history of the once grandiose city. Unfortunately it seems that Rome has not been able to amend the defective mentality and social constructs of the society that enabled its fall to ruins in the first place.

The Pantheon. Visit inside free of charge.

Before I continue any further I want to make myself clear that my homeland is not perfect in any way imaginable. We have many current flaws in our current society and we have no shame in admitting that. But we do our damn best to fix the issues at hand.
As per my experience as a traveller I feel like the people in Rome just let things be broken. Then everybody clears their conscious by pretending it’s “the way of things just work around here”. 

Fontana de Trevi. Water fountain loaded with tourists.

My visit to Rome started with a way too crowded bus to our hotel and a sloppy but oppressive pickpocket attempt. An old man right behind me started to feel me up and search my empty pockets. I immediately slapped away his hands and watched him crawl further away in the bus. We exited the bus on the next stop and took the metro instead. Jeez.

The incident got me paranoid of other strangers pretty quickly. I had to abandon my cosy shorts because the front pockets were too easy to pickpocket and to change into heavier capri shorts which had more secure pockets. Have you ever wore jean-fabric in 35′ Celsius heat? Not pleasant at all.

Vittorio Emanuele monument. Yehaw.

First off the public transportation in Rome is laughable at best. I had heard the tales that one cannot trust the timetables in Italy but in Rome the timetables are literally non-existent. The busses arrive to your stop when they feel like it. You might wait 45 minutes and still see zero busses coming your way. It’s depressing when you see even the locals give up and just walk away from the bus stop. 

The old history, architecture and monuments of Rome and the Vatican city are fascinating but the general loss of logic in supermarkets, elevators, buildings and the people itself eat away the experience. 

Quick example: How many doors one elevator should need to be efficient and easy to use? The correct answer apparently in Italy is three. A door that opens the elevator shaft and two more doors that slide open inside the elevator. If even one of the doors is not 100% in place, the elevator will not work.

The Square of Vatican City.

If something has hit the sweet spot in Rome it’s definitely the food. The restaurants serve amazing delicasies and even a simple pasta carbonara will make you miss the chefs that prepared that heaven for you. Cafeterias will serve you fresh cappucino and tasty pastries for couple of bucks. If you are thinking about food-traveling, please do keep Rome in mind.

Yo Xzibit, Pimp my Pope Chariot.

Tomorrow will be our last full day in Rome and we will spend it by exploring the historical amphiteather Colosseum and Forum Romanum. Oh and shopping for a new mens shoulder bag as my “old” one broke down today. Never buy anything from Zalando kids. 

On Tuesday we will continue our journey and travel to Naples! Summon positive vibes and stay cool y’all! Good night!

– George